How to Acrylic Pour Painting for Beginners – Houston Art Class & Wine Glass

Is there a support group for Obsessive Compulsive Pour Painting (OCPP)? If so, I’ve taken the first step, it’s admitting I have a problem with OCPP. One late night while I was browsing through YouTube, I saw a the most awesome technique and I’ve not look back since! Fluid Art Pour Painting is a great technique that anyone can do! Ok, ok, I’ll admit it, I’m the first to “call out” just splattering paint on a canvas and labelling it “art.” Having formally studied art/painting my entire life, I truly believe it just shouldn’t be so easy to paint, one must experiment, fail, try again, again and again. Practice, practice, practice along with having the discipline and character to try and “perfect” the method.

Fluid art actually fulfills both of these criteria. Sure, you’re a weekend art warrior who dabbles. Sure, you’re just looking for a great piece of abstract art and don’t want to slave over it. But once you’ve practiced, the results can be awe-inspiring! This pour paint involved paint, fluid art and actual seashells!

The cool thing about fluid art is, if you mess it up, let it dry and paint over it! The way to begin this project is firstly getting something to paint on. When I say “something”, it could be a piece of wood, shoes, canvas (preferably) or as I’m about to show you, a random item such as a seahorse plaque.

Ok, material…check! Next, figure out your color palette. I always recommend doing just three colors and white. The three chosen colors can be in the same realm such as all “cool” colors (blues, purples, greens, etc) or you can choose all warm colors (reds, oranges, yellows) or be a rebel and choose anything. One very helpful hint, don’t choose the same color but in different values such as navy blue, royal blue and baby blue. You’ll end up with just a blue puddle. You must try different values such as Dark, Light and Bright. I chose Dark Purple, Magenta and Turquoise (and white of course.)

Some of you may be a bit overwhelmed with color so feel free to view this color combo chart.

Supplies needed:

Floetrol (available at your local hardware store)

Water (with some type of dropper or you can just pour)

4 cups  and 1 large cup

4 stirrers (popsicle sticks or spoons are ok, just something to stir with)

Silicone oil (again, at your hardware store)

Acrylic Paint

Item to paint

Thumbtacks

Plastic tablecloth or plastic tarp for table

Palette knife or small paint brush

(Optional: metallic paint or loose glitter)

Step 1

You’ll pour one color in each of your cups, depending on the item size.

I used small condiment cups since my item (seahorse) was relatively small. I filled each of the cups halfway with each color. Then pour 1/4 or 1/2 of the cup with the Floetrol liquid. Add 1/4 water with spoon, dropper or just pouring it in. Now mix VERY WELL with any tool (spoon, popscicle stick).

Step 2

This next step applies to all cup colors. After having mixed each cup separately, you will add ONLY 4 DROPS of the silicone oil. No, adding extra drops will not help your finished product. Mix each cup after adding oil VERY WELL.

Step 3

With the largest cup, that is empty, pour each color into the cup. Pour it slowly and at the edge of the large cup. DO NOT MIX. Make sure your table is covered with a plastic tablecloth or tarp. Yes, this next step sounds and looks like a disaster but here’s the fun part. Now pour the paint onto your canvas or item IN THE MIDDLE of the item. It bleeds over the edge and thats ok. Now pick up your item slowly and DO NOT TILT. Instead just start moving it as if it’s a piece of jello on a plate that you’d like to see jiggle. (No laughing.) NEVER TILT AT 45 DEGREE ANGLE, IT WILL POUR RIGHT OFF.

Step 4

Now what’s happening is the paint begins to swirl and look marbelized. The trick is NOT TO OVERLY MOVE the artwork. If you do, all the colors will eventually mix together and you’ll have no “veins” or distinct color separation. Don’t feel bad if you have to work your finger to move some colors or if you have a large lump of solid color. Remember you can always pour a bit more of your leftover paint right onto that spot.

Step 5

Don’t be frustrated, sometimes a “Pour” works beautifully and sometimes you’ll question why you aren’t considered “color blind.” Just kidding, but really guys, this is about fun and experimentation. I take it to the next level by adding “metallic acrylic paint” such as gold or silver as one of the colors or even sprinkling loose glitter in a line to look like an “agate” or sparkly marble vein. I’ve even seen some who add rhinestones, pebbles and more.

Notes:

This project will take 2 days to dry. Do not touch it, you’ll have a big thumbprint on your masterpiece. Try not to move it, so be aware of where you begin your art project since it will remain there for 2 days. Also, some of you wonder why I put thumbtacks on the list. When working with canvas, I add the thumbtacks with the “heads” onto the back of my canvas so that it props it up above the tablecloth and prevents it from sticking. Be aware of the edges of your project so that it doesn’t look to rough on the sides. If necessary, don’t be afraid to get your hands dirty. Yes, vinyl or other gloves are ok. Good luck and happy crafting!

If you live in Houston, TX and want to take a fluid pour painting class from the experts visit us at Art Class & Wine Glass.

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How to Acrylic Pour Painting for Beginners – Houston Art Class & Wine Glass

Is there a support group for Obsessive Compulsive Pour Painting (OCPP)? If so, I’ve taken the first step, it’s admitting I have a problem with OCPP. One late night while I was browsing through YouTube, I saw a the most awesome technique and I’ve not look back since! Fluid Art Pour Painting is a great technique that anyone can do! Ok, ok, I’ll admit it, I’m the first to “call out” just splattering paint on a canvas and labelling it “art.” Having formally studied art/painting my entire life, I truly believe it just shouldn’t be so easy to paint, one must experiment, fail, try again, again and again. Practice, practice, practice along with having the discipline and character to try and “perfect” the method.

Fluid art actually fulfills both of these criteria. Sure, you’re a weekend art warrior who dabbles. Sure, you’re just looking for a great piece of abstract art and don’t want to slave over it. But once you’ve practiced, the results can be awe-inspiring! This pour paint involved paint, fluid art and actual seashells!

The cool thing about fluid art is, if you mess it up, let it dry and paint over it! The way to begin this project is firstly getting something to paint on. When I say “something”, it could be a piece of wood, shoes, canvas (preferably) or as I’m about to show you, a random item such as a seahorse plaque.

Ok, material…check! Next, figure out your color palette. I always recommend doing just three colors and white. The three chosen colors can be in the same realm such as all “cool” colors (blues, purples, greens, etc) or you can choose all warm colors (reds, oranges, yellows) or be a rebel and choose anything. One very helpful hint, don’t choose the same color but in different values such as navy blue, royal blue and baby blue. You’ll end up with just a blue puddle. You must try different values such as Dark, Light and Bright. I chose Dark Purple, Magenta and Turquoise (and white of course.)

Some of you may be a bit overwhelmed with color so feel free to view this color combo chart.

Supplies needed:

Floetrol (available at your local hardware store)

Water (with some type of dropper or you can just pour)

4 cups  and 1 large cup

4 stirrers (popsicle sticks or spoons are ok, just something to stir with)

Silicone oil (again, at your hardware store)

Acrylic Paint

Item to paint

Thumbtacks

Plastic tablecloth or plastic tarp for table

Palette knife or small paint brush

(Optional: metallic paint or loose glitter)

Step 1

You’ll pour one color in each of your cups, depending on the item size.

I used small condiment cups since my item (seahorse) was relatively small. I filled each of the cups halfway with each color. Then pour 1/4 or 1/2 of the cup with the Floetrol liquid. Add 1/4 water with spoon, dropper or just pouring it in. Now mix VERY WELL with any tool (spoon, popscicle stick).

Step 2

This next step applies to all cup colors. After having mixed each cup separately, you will add ONLY 4 DROPS of the silicone oil. No, adding extra drops will not help your finished product. Mix each cup after adding oil VERY WELL.

Step 3

With the largest cup, that is empty, pour each color into the cup. Pour it slowly and at the edge of the large cup. DO NOT MIX. Make sure your table is covered with a plastic tablecloth or tarp. Yes, this next step sounds and looks like a disaster but here’s the fun part. Now pour the paint onto your canvas or item IN THE MIDDLE of the item. It bleeds over the edge and thats ok. Now pick up your item slowly and DO NOT TILT. Instead just start moving it as if it’s a piece of jello on a plate that you’d like to see jiggle. (No laughing.) NEVER TILT AT 45 DEGREE ANGLE, IT WILL POUR RIGHT OFF.

Step 4

Now what’s happening is the paint begins to swirl and look marbelized. The trick is NOT TO OVERLY MOVE the artwork. If you do, all the colors will eventually mix together and you’ll have no “veins” or distinct color separation. Don’t feel bad if you have to work your finger to move some colors or if you have a large lump of solid color. Remember you can always pour a bit more of your leftover paint right onto that spot.

Step 5

Don’t be frustrated, sometimes a “Pour” works beautifully and sometimes you’ll question why you aren’t considered “color blind.” Just kidding, but really guys, this is about fun and experimentation. I take it to the next level by adding “metallic acrylic paint” such as gold or silver as one of the colors or even sprinkling loose glitter in a line to look like an “agate” or sparkly marble vein. I’ve even seen some who add rhinestones, pebbles and more.

Notes:

This project will take 2 days to dry. Do not touch it, you’ll have a big thumbprint on your masterpiece. Try not to move it, so be aware of where you begin your art project since it will remain there for 2 days. Also, some of you wonder why I put thumbtacks on the list. When working with canvas, I add the thumbtacks with the “heads” onto the back of my canvas so that it props it up above the tablecloth and prevents it from sticking. Be aware of the edges of your project so that it doesn’t look to rough on the sides. If necessary, don’t be afraid to get your hands dirty. Yes, vinyl or other gloves are ok. Good luck and happy crafting!

If you live in Houston, TX and want to take a fluid pour painting class from the experts visit us at Art Class & Wine Glass.

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